“The rise of haute couture in the early 20th century dovetailed with advances in communication and travel, and so, too, the public’s unusual interest in this rarefied world. There are well-known stories of Paris policemen and taxi drivers being able to recognize couture, like a cop in the ’30s who refused to arrest a feminist agitator on the grounds that she was dressed by Molyneux. By the ’60s, everyone knew about the latest fashion, if not from Mary Quant, then from the Beatles. But sometime in the late ’80s, fashion discovered semiotics. Clothes suddenly acquired meaning (think of the efforts to “decode” a Helmut Lang show or almost any by Martin Margiela). You truly needed to be an expert to appreciate why a jacket was worn inside out or why a dress that made you look like a bag lady was cool. Susan Sontag described a similar shift in the arts in the mid-60s, noting that “the most interesting and creative art of our time is not open to the generally educated; it demands special effort; it speaks a specialized language.” Today, as high fashion moves closer to mass media — with brand-hosted YouTube channels, films, huge spectacles — there is pressure to simplify. I also wonder whether the surge of new brands — their shows often crammed with weird and banal designs — hasn’t caused elite designers to rethink matters. Hence more straightforward clothes.”

bombmagazine:

Amie Siegel on her work Provenance, now on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

"In mimicking the glossy spreads of shelter magazines, the film introduces a subtle complicity—one that is transferred to the viewer—in the production of desire."

(Read more)

really enjoyed this piece.

taces:

"across cultures, darker people suffer most. why?"

Andre 3000 at Lollapalooza,
August 2, 2014

(via cesaire)

When we think of great conservationists, or just ordinary Americans trekking in the outdoors, we don’t typically picture black faces. There are reasons for that: Today, more than a century since Young’s team opened up Sequoia National Park, blacks are still far less likely to explore its trails. A 2011 survey commissioned by the National Park Service showed that only 7 percent of visitors to the parks system were black. (Blacks make up nearly twice that percentage of the US population.) Latinos were similarly underrepresented.

"But if African-Americans don’t figure in our notion of America’s great outdoors, geographer Carolyn Finney argues, it is also because of how the story has been told, and who has been left out—black pioneers and ordinary folk whose contributions to the land have long gone ignored. Reclaiming those stories, she contends, could have huge implications for protecting our wilderness in the future.

futurescope:

The ‘Holographic’ 3D Video Machine is closer than you think

From the creators project:

Recently completed by Chris Helson and Sarah Jackets, two Scotland-based artist who have been honing away on the project for seven years, this innovative 3D video machine will make its debut on July 31, as part of the Alt-W at the Edinburgh Art Festival. Inspired by the famous holographic message sent to Obi-Wan Kenobi from Princess Leia in Star Wars, the 360-degree piece, entitled Help Me Obi, has already won an Alt-w production award from New Media Scotland.

Inspired by scientific concepts that have garnered iconic cultural significance, Helson said the project is not to be confused with a 3D hologram: “We use the term holographic because there is nothing else like it,” said Helson. “The machine creates 360 [-degree] moving video objects apparently floating in space and the viewer is able to walk around the machine and see the video object from any position.”

[read more] [Helson & Jackets] [video & pictures from Helson & Jackets]

(via emergentfutures)

“'I will do such things—what they are yet I know not—but they shall be the terror of the earth.' So mad King Lear announces—and it is, as Bertrand Russell once noted, the Tough Guys’ point of view packed into a phrase. We’ll show them! Though what we’ll show them, and how we’ll show them, and to what end we’ll show them, and what we will say to the mothers of the children whose lives have been wasted in order to show them—those things remain as strangely unsayable for the serious men as they did for crazy Lear.”
qwantzfeed:

i’m sorry it didn’t work out between you two, nasa engineers :(
(Like my comic?  Support me on Patreon!)

accurate qwantzfeed:

i’m sorry it didn’t work out between you two, nasa engineers :(
(Like my comic?  Support me on Patreon!)

accurate qwantzfeed:

i’m sorry it didn’t work out between you two, nasa engineers :(
(Like my comic?  Support me on Patreon!)

accurate qwantzfeed:

i’m sorry it didn’t work out between you two, nasa engineers :(
(Like my comic?  Support me on Patreon!)

accurate